Tag Archives: ANZAC

ANZAC DAY

ANZAC Day is a national day of pride. A day of pride in the enduring spirit of mateship and ingenuity.

ANZAC Day is not just a day based on the remembering the events of Gallipoli and our lucky escape. It is remembering all the fallen Australians and what they fought for – whether it was the spirit of adventure, the defense of the British Empire or for the defence of the nation. In a way its probably a second rememberance/armistice day.

It is through these bonds of mateship that were long established in Australia before we federated our nation that Australia became what it is today. It was in the days when the country still rode on the sheep’s back, we faced up to the harshness of working the Australian land but we were relatively relaxed because of the great distances involved in travelling from one station to another. We never really rushed unless there was an emergency. This is one of the reasons Australia is so relaxed today. Today it is sometimes referred to laziness but for me that is only for those that don’t understand the genesis of Australia.

Mateship was also defined for me in the war mythos of Australia. My recollecctions are not entirely what they used to be but one such story in I think WWI was the Aussies kept coming, if their leader had been killed, someone else would take charge and if that person was killed then someone else would and so on, all the way down the line.

There are a few that remain that promote that ANZAC Day is about Nationalism but I feel too often they mix up nationalism with patriotism.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines nationalism as: Advocacy of or support for the interests of one’s own nation, esp. to the exclusion or detriment of the interests of other nations. Also: advocacy of or support for national independence or self-determination.”

Patriotism as: 1.The character or passion of a patriot; love of or zealous devotion to one’s country.

2. One who disinterestedly or self-sacrificingly exerts himself to promote the wellbeing of his country; one whose ruling passion is the love of his country; one who maintains and defends his country’s freedom or rights.

As you can see there are distinct differences.

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ANZAC Day

This is the post I write every ANZAC DAY

ANZAC Day is a national day of pride. A day of pride in the enduring spirit of mateship and ingenuity.

ANZAC Day is not just a day based on the remembering the events of Gallipoli and our lucky escape. It is remembering all the fallen Australians and what they fought for – whether it was the spirit of adventure, the defense of the British Empire or for the defence of the nation. In a way its probably a second rememberance/armistice day.

It is through these bonds of mateship that were long established in Australia before we federated our nation that Australia became what it is today. It was in the days when the country still rode on the sheep’s back, we faced up to the harshness of working the Australian land but we were relatively relaxed because of the great distances involved in travelling from one station to another. We never really rushed unless there was an emergency. This is one of the reasons Australia is so relaxed today. Today it is sometimes referred to laziness but for me that is only for those that don’t understand the genesis of Australia.

Mateship was also defined for me in the war mythos of Australia. My recollecctions are not entirely what they used to be but one such story in I think WWI was the Aussies kept coming, if their leader had been killed, someone else would take charge and if that person was killed then someone else would and so on, all the way down the line.

There are a few that remain that promote that ANZAC Day is about Nationalism but I feel too often they mix up nationalism with patriotism.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines nationalism as: Advocacy of or support for the interests of one’s own nation, esp. to the exclusion or detriment of the interests of other nations. Also: advocacy of or support for national independence or self-determination.”

Patriotism as: 1.The character or passion of a patriot; love of or zealous devotion to one’s country.

2. One who disinterestedly or self-sacrificingly exerts himself to promote the wellbeing of his country; one whose ruling passion is the love of his country; one who maintains and defends his country’s freedom or rights.

As you can see there are distinct differences.

There is at least one thing I can agree on with Mr Howard:

Mr Howard said his tenure in the Lodge had brought back a sense of inner strength to Australians, to believe in themselves and their country.

Kokoda Day

Kokoda Day, commemorates the day in 1942 that a small band of Australian soldiers re-took the township of Kokoda as part of a legendary campaign.

It is not an official holiday like ANZAC day that celebrates our great escape from Gallipoli or as some would say, our greatest war time loss. Not withstanding it is the battle that forged the greatest nation in the world, Australia.

Kokoda Day is about celebrating Australia’s greatest war time victory; The defence of the very nation itself.

Now there are a few who wish the date to be the 29th August in honour of Private Bruce Steel Kingsbury who earned the VC posthumously on this date.

In New Guinea, the Battalion to which Private Kingsbury belonged had been holding a position in the Isurava area for two days against continuous and fierce enemy attacks. On 29th August, 1942, the enemy attacked in such force that they succeeded in breaking through the Battalion’s right flank, creating serious threats both to the rest of the Battalion and to its Headquarters. To avoid the situation becoming more desperate it was essential to regain immediately lost ground on the right flank. Private Kingsbury, who was one of the few survivors of a Platoon which had been overrun and severely cut about by the enemy, immediately volunteered to join a different platoon which had been ordered to counter- attack. He rushed forward firing the Bren gun from his hip through terrific machine-gun fire and succeeded in clearing a path through the enemy. Continuing to sweep enemy positions with his fire and inflicting an extremely high number of casualties on them, Private Kingsbury was then seen to fall to the ground shot dead by the bullet from a sniper hiding in the wood. Private Kingsbury displayed a complete disregard for his own safety. His initiative and superb courage made possible the recapture of a position which undoubtedly saved Battalion Headquarters, as well as causing heavy casualties amongst the enemy. His coolness, determination and devotion to duty in the face of great odds was an inspiration to his comrades. 9th February 1943.

Or it could be on one of the days where Australian Forces took back control of the Kokoda track. At least this day will be on the correct day given our similar timezone with PNG, not a day early like we do with ANZAC day due to timezones.

It is said Gallipoli forged a nation (Ken Oath) and Kokoda saved a nation (Strewth).

Too Right I say.